Take 3: Cyrano de Bergerac (1990) Review

When I published my Hallmark Hall of Fame Reading Challenge last March, one of the literary works I listed was Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand. While I’ve never read the play, I was interested in seeing how Hallmark Hall of Fame would adapt this particular story. Sadly, I couldn’t find this specific version on DVD, VHS, or digital, as a lot of the collection’s movies from the ‘50s to about the early ‘80s appear to be lost. When I discovered Vincent Perez starred in the 1990 adaptation of Cyrano de Bergerac, I thought seeing this version would be the next best thing. It was also a perfect choice for The Third Broadway Bound Blogathon, as it was listed under the “Movies Made From Broadway Shows” section in the very first announcement for the event. This blogathon also happens to take place days before Vincent’s birthday, so this became another reason to review Cyrano de Bergerac! I was able to obtain a copy of this film, but I had to purchase two DVDs and a Blu-Ray just to find one that worked with my home entertainment system. Read my review to find out if this film was worth the search!

After weeks of searching, I finally found a DVD copy of Cyrano de Bergerac I could watch! Screenshot taken by me, Sally Silverscren.

Things I liked about the film:

The acting: Since I chose this film because of Vincent’s involvement, I’ll talk about his performance first. One aspect that stood out to me was how his voice was always soft-spoken. This fit his character, Christian de Neuvillette, well because he wasn’t as confident with his words, like Cyrano. I also noticed how sincere Vincent’s performance came across. No matter what situation Christian is in, he always has his heart in the right place. The goodness of this character showed through in Vincent’s portrayal, which helped Christian be as likable as possible! Since I just mentioned Cyrano, I will now talk about Gérard Depardieu’s performance. The word I’d use to describe his portrayal of the titular character is expressive. Every feeling Cyrano was experiencing felt genuine, emotions appearing in his facial expressions, body language, and poetry. Toward the beginning of the film, Cyrano performs at a local theater and participates in a dual shortly after. Gérard was able to adapt to every situation given to his character. Besides Vincent and Gérard, the cast is filled with talented actors and actresses. Anne Brochet is one of those cast members, bringing a gentle nature to her character, Roxane. Through emotionality, Anne brings her character to life in a way that feels believable. One example is when Christian and Cyrano visit her at her balcony.

The historical accuracy: As I’ve said before on this blog, the quality of a film’s historical accuracy can show how much a creative team cares about their project. The historical accuracy of Cyrano de Bergerac is proof of this statement! The world in this movie felt immersive, presenting the locations with a sense of realism. The set designs reflected the financial situation/social status of the characters, with the local bakery and Roxane’s room being perfect examples. While the bakery featured a simpler interior design, Roxane’s room appeared elegant. Costumes looked appropriate for that specific time period, with the color palette for the cast’s wardrobe ranging from lighter shades of beige and blue to darker tones of gray and black. Tools and utensils from yesteryear were used by the characters, such as Cyrano and Christian applying a wax seal on letters to Roxane. This movie shows that no detail was ignored.

The humor: One of the strongest elements of this film was the humor! Not only was it well-written, but the humor itself seemed to fit that world. The funny moments within Cyrano de Bergerac were also given good executions by the actors. My favorite scene is when Christian continuously interrupts Cyrano’s story by making references to Cyrano’s nose. During this exchange, Christian would sometimes only say “nose” to get a reaction from Cyrano. While Christian appears unfazed by Cyrano’s reactions, Cyrano becomes more irritated as the scene continues. This scene made me repeatedly laugh, as I found it hilarious!

The Third Broadway Bound Blogathon banner created by Rebecca from Taking Up Room. Image found at https://takinguproom.wordpress.com/2020/03/20/announcing-the-third-broadway-bound-blogathon/.

What I didn’t like about the film:

The under-utilization of Vincent Perez: Vincent Perez is one of the reasons why I sought out the 1990 adaptation of Cyrano de Bergerac, as I’ve enjoyed his acting performances so far. Before watching this movie, I knew his involvement in the project was a break-out role and likely the biggest role he received at that time. However, because Vincent is billed as the main supporting actor, I was disappointed to found out he was in the film for a limited amount of time. The majority of the story revolves around Cyrano, which means that Vincent was only given a reduced amount of material to work with. There were even large intervals when Vincent was not featured on screen. Usually, main supporting actors receive about half the screen-time the film’s protagonist does. In the case of Cyrano de Bergerac, however, the antagonist, Comte Antoine de Guiche, is given more prominence in the production than Vincent’s character.

The war storyline: Prior to seeing Cyrano de Bergerac, I had a general knowledge of what the story was about. The movie is even classified as a “comedy-drama”, with the assumption that the romantic aspects of the story would fall under the “drama” part. While the comedy and romance within Cyrano de Bergerac dominated the first half of the film, a storyline involving a war took over the film’s second half. The build-up toward the event and the reasoning behind it felt too “inside baseball”. It also caused the entire story to pull a “bait and switch” with its overall tone. Based on the knowledge I had about this film and even based on the DVD cover, I expected the light-hearted tone within the first half to have a consistent presence throughout the film. Even though there were romantic and light-hearted moments within the second half, some of them didn’t feel like they fit in the context of the war.

The poetic monologues: I’m aware that Cyrano is known for being “a man of many words”. I also know the original play was written only in verse. The poems themselves weren’t the issue, as the poetic monologues within this film were performed and written well. However, some of them lasted too long. Toward the end of the movie, Cyrano recited one of his signature monologues. Because it was long in time length, the monologue made the scene drawn out. I realize that the reason for the long monologues was to satisfy the film’s run-time. Personally, I think, at least, a few of the them should have been a bit shorter in length.

Birthday cake image created by Freepik at freepik.com. <a href=’https://www.freepik.com/free-vector/chocolate-birthday-cakes-collection_765437.htm’>Designed by Freepik</a>. <a href=”https://www.freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/birthday”>Birthday vector created by Freepik</a>. Image found at freepik.com.

My overall impression:

I’ve heard that the 1990 adaptation of Cyrano de Bergeracis “the definitive film version of the Edmond Rostand play from 1897.” This is the only film version of the story I have seen. As I also said in the introduction, I have never read the play. So, I can only judge this film simply as a film. Cyrano de Bergerac is a good, solid movie! I found myself invested as the story was unfolding and I can definitely see how this could be presented on Broadway. The poetic dialogue was an interesting choice that helped this project achieve a unique identity. However, there were aspects that prevented the production from being better than it was. Some of the poetic monologues were too long, causing scenes to feel drawn out. Despite flaws like that one, I’m glad I was given an opportunity to see this film! If you do choose to watch this version of Cyrano de Bergerac, keep in mind it is a rarer title to find on physical media. While this movie did receive a Blu-Ray release, prices can get expensive.

Overall score: 7.6 out of 10

Do you enjoy movies based on Broadway shows? Are there any literary adaptations that you like? Tell me in the comment section!

Have fun on Broadway!

Sally Silverscreen

13 thoughts on “Take 3: Cyrano de Bergerac (1990) Review

  1. Pingback: Broadway Bound 2020: Day Two – Taking Up Room

  2. I didn’t know about this version with Gerard Depardieu, and I bet he’s utterly fabulous here.

    I have to say I’m not much for a faithful adaptation of this story because of the speeches. I feel they cause the story to lose momentum, and I much prefer looser adaptations such as Roxanne. However, with Depardieu in the role, I’ll definitely give it a go.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for reading my review, Silver Screenings! Gerard did a really good job with the material he was given, providing one reason to check this movie out! Avoiding more faithful versions of ‘Cyrano de Bergerac’ is understandable, as some of the poetic monologues are long in time-length. I haven’t seen other adaptations of this story, so I can’t comment on them.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. John L. Harmon

    Glad your search was worth it. I too have never seen a film of Cyrano de Bergerac, except for a Roxanne starring Steve Martin and Daryl Hannah. It sounds like this 1990 version would be a good one to see.

    Oh, and to answer your question. I have a fondness for Carrie the musical, based on Stephen King’s novel. I’ve never seen it performed but I love the soundtrack.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for checking out my review, John! As I said in my post, ‘Cyrano de Bergerac’ is a good, solid film. So I’d definitely recommend it! The Carrie musical is one that I haven’t seen. However, I did see the Anasiasia musical last year and loved it!

      Like

  4. I was always partial to the Jose Ferrer version myself…but at least neither of them are that steaming crap-pile “Roxanne”…just another warmed-over Steve Martin hack-job of a classic.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for reading my review, J-Dub! I haven’t seen any of these versions, so I can’t share my opinion on them. If you didn’t do this yet, you should write an article on your blog about why you don’t like ‘Roxanne’.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I honestly can’t think of anyone playing Cyrano except for Gerard Depardieu–he was a perfect choice. It’s a very unique part for him. Thanks again for joining the blogathon, and I enjoyed reading your review! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Le Magalhaes

    I’ve seen a few Cyranos so far.
    This 1990 version was the first one I saw, and how I got acquainted with the story. I liked it.
    Then I watched the 1950 Hollywood version that gave José Ferrer his Oscar and Ferrer is absolutely delightful as Cyrano. It’s a performance of a lifetime.
    Last year I watched the premier of Edmond, a French film about the writing of the play Cyrano de Bergerac. It is a wonderful comedy, with some made-up facts for comedy reasons I suppose, but a great film nonetheless. In the end they show clips of Cyrano film adaptations, including one from the 1890s with the actor that originated the character on the stage! It was a marvelous moment.
    Great post, and I hope I gave you some tips about diving deeper into Cyrano.
    Kisses!
    Le

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Pingback: Take 3: Cyrano de Bergerac (1990) Review — 18 Cinema Lane | Crime/Mystery Film & Writing Festival

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