Buzzwordathon 2022: Review of ‘Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels’ by Jessica Fletcher & Donald Bain + Blogathon Annoucement

For August’s Buzzwordathon, the theme is ‘Items/Objects’. Originally, I was going to read Redwood Curtain by Lanford Wilson. This is because a) a curtain could be considered an item/object and b) I already own a copy of Lanford Wilson’s play. But I ended up watching the film adaptation of Redwood Curtain earlier than expected. Therefore, I decided to write an editorial on how similar and different Redwood Curtain’s adaptation is from its source material. That editorial will be published during The Fifth Broadway Bound Blogathon. In the meantime, I have selected Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels for this month’s Buzzwordathon, especially since ‘jewels’ could also be considered an item/object! I have blogathon news of my own as well, so keep reading to find out what’s to come!

Here is a photo of my copy of Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels. Screenshot taken by me, Sally Silverscreen.

Back in 2019, I reviewed Murder, She Wrote: The Highland Fling Murders. One of the favorite aspects of that book was how distinctive each character was, as there were a lot of characters in the story. Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels contains the same strength. Whether in Cabot Cove or on the Queen Mary 2, each character was unique from one another. At the beginning of the book, the readers are introduced to Maniram, Cabot Cove’s newest resident. He is a jeweler who owns his own jewelry store, sharing his knowledge of valuable gems with Jessica and her friends. Also in this story is Maniram’s cousin, Rupesh. He is a man of many talents, from being a skilled karate athlete to being very knowledgeable with computers. Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels presents him as a room steward on the Queen Mary 2. But as the story progresses, readers find out just how different Rupesh is from Maniram.

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Out of the Murder, She Wrote episodes I’ve seen so far, my favorite one is “Film Flam”. What makes this episode great is its educational and insightful approach to the movie premiere process. In Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels, part of the book takes place in London. Instead of bringing up locales that many readers would be familiar with, locations that aren’t often talked about are included in the text. One of them was Grosvenor Square. According to the book, this area was known as “Little America”. A reason is General Eisenhower’s headquarters were located in the Square. During her London adventure, Jessica has dinner at a restaurant called The Ivy. This establishment does exist, boasting a fine dining experience, according to The Ivy’s website. In the book, Jessica describes the restaurant as a “celebrity-driven restaurant that has long been a favorite of London’s theatrical and motion picture crowd”. Meanwhile, The Ivy’s website states “With an enduring celebration of the arts and culture that have defined it since its naissance, The Ivy remains part of the fabric of London life, and a home away from home for its many loyal guests”. Because of reading Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels, I learned more about London’s landscape that I didn’t know before.

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What I like about the Murder, She Wrote books is how the stories aren’t novelizations of pre-existing episodes. While this is the case for Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels, it didn’t really feel like the show. That’s because so few characters from the show and previous books were featured. In Murder, She Wrote: The Highland Fling Murders, a Scotland Yard agent and friend of Jessica’s, George Sutherland, was working alongside Jessica to solve that book’s mystery. When I found out George would be in Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels, I was excited to read about his and Jessica’s reunion. But as I read this book, I discovered George only made a handful of appearances. Compared to other mystery books I’ve read, the sense of urgency in Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels was weaker. What contributed to this flaw was how most of the story focused on Jessica’s trip instead of the mystery. Another contributor was how two intelligence agents were responsible for solving the case. That creative decision made the mystery seem like it was out of Jessica’s reach. It affected her ability of getting involved with the book’s case, especially compared to the show.

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I haven’t read many of the books in the Murder, She Wrote series. But out of those I have read, Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels is my least favorite. This book was fine, interesting enough to keep me invested in the story. However, I was expecting more. There was a short period of time where I lost motivation to read this book. Not wanting to experience another Buzzwordathon fail, I finished the story, especially since I wanted to find out what happens. I do plan to read more Murder, She Wrote books. One of them will be reviewed for my upcoming blogathon. As I stated in the introduction, I had blogathon news to share. That news is I’m hosting a blogathon this November! The theme is ‘World Television Day’. More details about the event will follow…

Overall score: 3.6 out of 5 stars

Have fun during Buzzwordathon!

Sally Silverscreen

Disclaimer: Because Murder, She Wrote: The Queen’s Jewels is a murder mystery story, the subject of murder is brought up on more than one occasion. A suicide is also briefly mentioned and swearing does occur a few times.

Buzzwordathon 2022: Review of ‘The Bookshop on the Corner’ by Jenny Colgan

It’s that time again; another review for this year’s Buzzwordathon! July’s theme is ‘Bookish Words’. Since the word ‘bookshop’ was an obvious choice, I selected The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan. At the beginning of my copy of the book, Jenny includes a message to the readers. This message explains the different places a book can be read, sharing tips to help the reader have a good reading experience. Jenny’s message was a nice gesture to her audience, as it felt genuine. In this message, Jenny shares how she purposefully gave her characters different names, in an attempt to avoid confusion. As a reader, I appreciated this creative decision because it was easier to remember who was who. But another creative decision I liked was how Jenny gave each character a distinct personality and characteristics. With a mostly strong use of character development, this allowed the characters to be unique and memorable from one another. The use of descriptive imagery toward settings and scenery was one of the strongest components of The Bookshop on the Corner! Through select word choices, Jenny paints a distinguishable landscape between the city (Birmingham, England) and the country (Kirrinfief, Scotland) that feels realistic. One example is when Jenny describes sunshine in the countryside. She refers to this natural element as “golden”. She also writes about the sunlight’s effect on other pieces of nature, such as how it is “illuminating every crystal raindrop”. Literary details like these help elaborate the story’s surroundings.

Here is a photo of my copy of The Bookshop on the Corner. Screenshot taken by me, Sally Silverscreen.

There’s nothing wrong with incorporating romance into a story. In fact, some of my favorite Hallmark films feature at least one romance. But what makes or breaks that romance is the execution of its dynamic. Many types of romances can be found in literature, from stories about “enemies to lovers” to a tale revolving around “college sweethearts”. When an author chooses one of these dynamics early on in their writing process and consistently utilizes that dynamic, that story may have the potential to be a well-told narrative. Unfortunately, this is not what happened in The Bookshop on the Corner. While reading Jenny’s book, it seems like she couldn’t decide which romance dynamic she wanted to adopt. Instead of choosing one and sticking with it, Jenny picked four of them. Because of their inconsistent presence and lack of confidence, none of these dynamics worked. In fact, the fourth romance dynamic (which is found toward the end of the book) was so unexpected, it felt like I was reading a completely different book.

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The inconsistent execution of the romance dynamics is just one flaw in The Bookshop on the Corner. The titular bookshop (which was not a brick-and-mortar store or on the corner, as the cover and title suggest) is more of an afterthought. That’s because the majority of the story is a “slice of life” tale chronicling the protagonist’s adjustment to her surroundings. Nina’s, the protagonist’s, literary matchmaking is really moments of convenient coincidence just to push the story forward, instead of problem-solving skills Nina acquired over time. The more I read The Bookshop on the Corner, I more I found myself disliking Nina. What started as an admirable and somewhat relatable protagonist evolved into a selfish and narrow-minded person. When I first read the synopsis for this book, it sounded like a typical Hallmark Channel “rom-com”. But now that I read The Bookshop on the Corner, it is nothing like those productions. If you enjoy Hallmark movies, books about books, or Scottish stories, please seek elsewhere. You aren’t missing anything by not reading this story.

Overall score: 1.7 out of 5 stars

Have fun during Buzzwordathon!

Sally Silverscreen

Disclaimer: As I mentioned in my review, The Bookshop on the Corner is not like a typical Hallmark Channel “rom-com”. The content that prevents it from being like that aforementioned type of story is the following:

  • Several chapters discuss a male and female character having sex
  • Some swearing can be found throughout the story
  • One chapter chronicles a lamb giving birth. A lamb being injured is also mentioned.
  • At one point in the story, Nina talks to her friend about a character from a picture book being presented unfavorably. That friend calls Nina out for sounding “weird”.
  • A Latvian man is described as “exotic”
  • Nina’s friend, Surinder, says, on more than one occasion, Nina has “gone native” after she moved to the country.
  • A teenage character is described as being “puppy fat”
  • A character with MS (Multiple Sclerosis) is briefly discussed

My third Sunshine Blogger Award of 2019!

Last month, I was nominated for the Sunshine Blogger Award by Annlyel from Annlyel Online. However, because I’ve recently taken two out of town trips and had several blogging related things on my plate, I wasn’t able to accept the award as soon as I had wanted to. Now, I have set aside some time to finally publish my blog post for my third Sunshine Blogger Award! Before I list the rules, as well as the questions with my answers, I want to thank Annlyel for choosing to nominate me for this award! I still can’t believe that I’ve won five awards within the one year that I have been blogging! What really makes the awards I’ve won so special is that each of the nominators had believed in me, as a blogger, enough to want to give my blog the time of day. This amount of belief gives me the confidence to be as great of a blogger as I can be!

Check out Annlyel’s blog at this link: https://annlyelonline.wordpress.com/

Sunshine Blogger Award banner
Sunshine Blogger Award banner found at https://annlyelonline.wordpress.com/2019/05/14/ive-been-nominated-for-the-sunshine-blogger-award/.

The Rules

  1. Thank the person who nominated you and provide a link to their blog.
  2. Answer the eleven questions from the blogger who nominated you.
  3. Nominate eleven bloggers.
  4. Create eleven new questions for your nominees to answer.

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Annlyel’s Questions and My Answers

  1. If you can, which movie is your favorite of all time? There are several movies that I absolutely love. But since I have to pick one for this question, I’ll go with Atlantis: The Lost Empire! Among Disney’s collection of animated films, Atlantis: The Lost Empire is a very different kind of story. However, it still has that familiar sense of “Disney magic”!
  2. Have you been to Disney World? If so, what’s your favorite park? Yes, on more than one occasion, in fact! There are so many great locations in this Orlando, Florida amusement park. But, when it comes to favorites, it’s a tie between Disney M.G.M. Studios (or as it’s now known as Disney Hollywood Studios) and Magic Kingdom. As a fan of movies, I think it’s so cool that Disney created a whole “land” dedicated to this topic. With the Magic Kingdom, you can’t go wrong with an original classic.
  3. Who’s your favorite Star Wars character? I’m not as invested in the Stars Wars franchise as I am with other film series. I have seen the films from the original trilogy, though, so I’ll choose Yoda and the Ewoks. The Ewoks are so fierce and adorable, while Yoda is kind and wise. Frankly, I’ve always wished that I could give Yoda a hug!
  4. Who’s your favorite Marvel superhero? Definitely Bucky Barnes! I’ve talked about him plenty of times on this blog, so I don’t really need an explanation.
  5. Who’s your favorite DC Comics superhero? When it comes to superheroes in film, I have found myself more invested in the MCU heroes than those from DC. For this question, though, I’ll say Batman is my favorite DC hero. Over the years, I have enjoyed watching the Batman film from 1989. I also think that Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy has, for the most part, been solid. It’ll be interesting to see what Robert Pattinson has to offer, talent wise, to the iconic role.
  6. What’s your favorite guilty pleasure, pertaining to food? In my life, I don’t really have any “guilty pleasures” because I don’t feel guilty about liking the things that I do like. However, I will say that this edible “guilty pleasure” is mustard potato salad. Trust me, this dish is more delicious than it sounds!
  7. What city is on your bucket list to visit? Definitely Kansas City, Missouri! I’d love to see the Hallmark Headquarters in person!
  8. What’s your favorite pastime activity? Ever since I could remember, I have always loved reading! I’m currently reading The Secret Garden in preparation for an upcoming blog post. This is my second time reading it, and so far, it’s a good book!
  9. Wakanda, Coruscant, or Hogwarts; which of these fictional worlds would you love to visit? Out of these three locations, I’d pick Wakanda. Since Bucky has spent some time there, he could give me a tour of some of his favorite spots. He could also introduce me to some of his newer friends, like T’Challa and Shuri. Then, we could all join forces and figure out how to have Wakanda become the host country for the Summer Olympics (this should totally be a plot point for either Black Panther 2 or Bucky and Sam’s show on Disney+).
  10. What’s your favorite novel of all time? I actually have several favorite books. But the one that I will share is A Little Princess! Sara is such a great protagonist and the “all girls are princesses” message still holds true!
  11. What’s your favorite sporting event? No doubt, it’s the Cheerleading and Dance Worlds! Competitive cheer and dance are my favorite sports, so this particular event is the biggest event for them. I’m hoping that in the 2020 Summer Olympics, cheer and dance teams can be included into the overall athletic program.

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My Eleven Nominees

  • Gill from Realweegiemidget Reviews
  • Ailish from Ailish Sinclair
  • Lee from Lee’s Movie Reviews
  • Eric from Diary of A Movie Maniac
  • Hisfamestilllives from His Fame Still Lives
  • 70srichard from 30 Years On: 1984 a Great Year for Movies
  • Delaram from Delaram Art & Design
  • Allie from Often Off Topic
  • Rebecca from Taking Up Room
  • Debbie from MOON IN GEMINI
  • Rob from MovieRob

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My Eleven Questions

  1. Which fictional, mythical, or extinct creature/animal would you want to have as a pet?
  2. Have you ever watched a Hallmark movie? If so, which one was it?
  3. What is the one TV show that you wish hadn’t been cancelled?
  4. There’s a pop culture themed exhibit at you nearest museum! If you could suggest a piece of movie, television, literary, or theatrical memorabilia to include in the exhibit, what would you choose?
  5. Which two movies or television shows would you love to see have a crossover event? This can be any two films or any two television shows (cancelled or current).
  6. Is there a remake, sequel, or franchise continuation that you wish never existed? If so, what is it?
  7. If you could be an audience member at any sports event, what would it be?
  8. What was your last blog post about?
  9. Which party theme is your favorite (example: Movie theme, Halloween theme)?
  10. Do you have a blogging tip that has helped you as a blogger? If so, share it with your readers!
  11. What was the best purchase you made at a garage sale, rummage sale, flea market, thrift store, etc.?

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Congratulations to all eleven nominees!

Sally Silverscreen

Introducing the Hallmark Hall of Fame Reading Challenge

Happy National Reading Month! When this time of year comes around, I usually don’t do anything to celebrate the occasion. As a reader, I have felt bad about not doing anything to acknowledge it. But, now that I have a blog, I have the opportunity to commemorate National Reading Month! Over the years, I’ve observed how many Hallmark Hall of Fame movies are based on pre-existing literature. This inspired me to create the Hallmark Hall of Fame Reading Challenge! As I was researching the history of Hallmark Hall of Fame, I discovered that there are a lot of plays, short stories, and novels that were adapted into films. Honestly, there were so much pre-existing literature associated with Hallmark Hall of Fame, it took me several days to complete this list. Even though this reading list is very long, you do not have to complete this reading challenge within the month of March. In fact, you can complete this challenge whenever you want! Also, you can read as many or as few books as you like! If you want to watch the Hallmark Hall of Fame movies that these literary works were adapted into, that is completely optional. Now, I’ll explain the set-up of this reading challenge list!

Starting on the left, each book is listed in the chronological order of the film’s release. For instance, even though Richard Paul Evans’ book, The Locket, was published in 1998, the movie adaptation was released in 2002. The title of the book and the book’s author are listed next. After that, the title of the film is placed within parentheses. There are times when a film adaptation does not share the same title as its respective piece of literature. A recent example of this is The Second Sister being the basis for Christmas Everlasting. Feel free to scroll through the list and find your next piece of literature for the Hallmark Hall of Fame Reading Challenge!

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Hallmark Hall of Fame Reading Challenge

2018 – The Second Sister by Marie Bostwick (Christmas Everlasting)

2018 – The Beach House by Mary Alice Monroe (The Beach House)

2017 – The Christmas Train by David Baldacci (The Christmas Train)

2017 – Love Locks by Cory Martin (Love Locks)

2016 – A Heavenly Christmas by Rhonda Merwarth (A Heavenly Christmas)

2012 – Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor by Lisa Kleypas (Christmas with Holly)

2012 – A Smile as Big as the Moon by Mike Kersjes with Joe Layden (A Smile as Big as the Moon)

2011 – Have a Little Faith by Mitch Albom (Have a Little Faith)

2011 – Nobody Don’t Love Nobody: Lessons on Love from the School with No Name by Stacey Bess (Beyond the Blackboard)

2011 – The Last Valentine by James Michael Pratt (The Lost Valentine)

2010 – The November Christmas by Greg Coppa (November Christmas)

2010 – The Lois Wilson Story: When Love Is Not Enough by William G. Borchert (When Love Is Not Enough: The Lois Wilson Story)

2009 – A Dog Named Christmas by Greg Kincaid (A Dog Named Christmas)

2009 – Irena Sendler: Mother of the Children of the Holocaust by Anna Mieszkowska (The Courageous Heart of Irena Sendler)

2008 – Front of the Class: How Tourette Syndrome Made Me the Teacher I Never Had by Brad Cohen with Lisa Wysocky (Front of the Class)

2008 – Sweet Nothing In My Ear: A Play In Two Acts by Stephen Sachs (Sweet Nothing In My Ear)

2007 – Pictures of Hollis Woods by Patricia Reilly Giff (Pictures of Hollis Woods)

2007 – The Valley of Light by Terry Kay (The Valley of Light)

2006 – Candles on Bay Street by K.C. McKinnon (Candles on Bay Street)

2006 — If Nights Could Talk: A Family Memoir by Marsha Recknagel (In from the Night)

2006 – The Water is Wide by Pat Conroy (The Water Is Wide)

2005 – Silver Bells by Luanne Rice (Silver Bells)

2005 – Riding the Bus with My Sister by Rachel Simon (Riding the Bus with My Sister)

2005 – The Magic of Ordinary Days by Ann Howard Creel (The Magic of Ordinary Days)

2004 – Back When We Were Grownups by Anne Tyler (Back When We Were Grownups)

2004 – Plainsong by Kent Haruf (Plainsong)

2004 – The Blackwater Lightship by Colm Toibin (The Blackwater Lightship)

2003 – Fallen Angel by Don J. Snyder (Fallen Angel)

2003 – A Painted House by John Grisham (A Painted House)

2003 – Girl in Hyacinth Blue by Susan Vreeland (Brush with Fate)

2002 – The Locket by Richard Paul Evans (The Locket)

2002 – My Sister’s Keeper: Learning to Cope with a Sibling’s Mental Illness by Margaret Moorman (My Sister’s Keeper)

2001 – Love and War in the Apennines by Eric Newby (In Love and War)

2001 – Follow the Stars Home by Luanne Rice (Follow the Stars Home)

2001 – The Flamingo Rising by Larry Baker (The Flamingo Rising)

2000 – The Runaway by Terry Kay (The Runaway)

2000 – Looking for Lost Bird: A Jewish Woman Discovers Her Navajo Roots by Yvette Melanson with Claire Safran (The Lost Child)

2000 – Cupid and Diana by Christina Bartolomeo (Cupid & Cate)

2000 – Atticus by Ron Hansen (Missing Pieces)

1999 – A Season for Miracles by Marilyn Pappano (A Season for Miracles)

1999 – Caleb’s Story by Patricia MacLachlan (Sarah, Plain and Tall: Winter’s End)

1999 – Durango by John B. Keane (Durango)

1999 – Night Ride Home by Barbara Esstman (Night Ride Home)

1998 – Grace & Glorie: A Play in Two Acts by Tom Ziegler (Grace & Glorie)

1998 – Saint Maybe by Anne Tyler (Saint Maybe)

1998 – Thunderwith by Libby Hathorn (The Echo of Thunder)

1998 – The Love Letter by Jack Finney (The Love Letter)

1997 – Ellen Foster by Kaye Gibbons (Ellen Foster)

1997 – What the Deaf-Mute Heard by G.D. Gearino (What the Deaf Man Heard)

1997 – For the Roses by Julie Garwood (Rose Hill)

1997 – The Wild Palms by William Faulkner (Old Man)

1996 – Calm at Sunset, Calm at Dawn by Paul Watkins (Calm at Sunset)

1996 – Lily Dale by Horton Foote (Lily Dale)

1996 – The Boys Next Door by Tom Griffin (The Boys Next Door)

1995 – Journey by Patricia MacLachlan (Journey)

1995 – Redwood Curtain by Lanford Wilson (Redwood Curtain)

1995 – The Piano Lesson by August Wilson (The Piano Lesson)

1994 – The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy (The Return of the Native)

1994 – Breathing Lessons by Anne Tyler (Breathing Lessons)

1993 – To Dance with the White Dog by Terry Kay (To Dance with the White Dog)

1993 – Skylark by Patricia MacLachlan (Skylark)

1992 – A Shayna Maidel by Barbara Lebow (Miss Rose White)

1992 – O Pioneers! by Willa Cather (O Pioneers!)

1991 – Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan (Sarah, Plain and Tall)

1990 — Decoration Day by John William Corrington (Decoration Day)

1990 – Father’s Arcane Daughter by E. L. Konigsburg (Caroline?)

1989 – The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher (The Shell Seekers)

1988 – The Tenth Man by Graham Greene (The Tenth Man)

1988 – April Morning by Howard Fast (April Morning)

1988 – Stones for Ibarra by Harriet Doerr (Stones for Ibarra)

1987 – Foxfire by Susan Cooper (Foxfire)

1987 – The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett (The Secret Garden)

1987 – Pack of Lies by Hugh Whitemore (Pack of Lies)

1987 – The Room Upstairs by Norma Levinson (The Room Upstairs)

1985 – Love Is Never Silent by Joanne Greenberg (Love Is Never Silent)

1985 – The Corsican Brothers by Alexandre Dumas (father) (The Corsican Brothers)

1984 – La Dame aux Camélias by Alexandre Dumas (son) (Camille)

1984 – The Master of Ballantrae by Robert Louis Stevenson (The Master of Ballantrae)

1983 – The Winter of our Discontent by John Steinbeck (The Winter of our Discontent)

1983 – Thursday’s Child by Victoria Poole (Thursday’s Child)

1982 – Witness for the Prosecution by Agatha Christie (Witness for the Prosecution)

1982 – The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame)

1981 – Dear Liar: A Biography in Two Acts: Adapted from the Correspondence of Bernard Shaw and Mrs. Patrick Campbell by Jerome Kilty (Dear Liar)

1980 – A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

1980 – Gideon’s Trumpet by Anthony Lewis (Gideon’s Trumpet)

1979 – All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (All Quiet on the Western Front)

1978 – Stubby Pringle’s Christmas by Jack Schaefer (Stubby Pringle’s Christmas)

1978 – Homely Girl, A Life: And Other Stories by Arthur Miller (“Fame” is included within this book) (Fame)

1977 – The Court-Martial of George Armstrong Custer: A Novel by Douglas C. Jones (The Court Martial of George Armstrong Custer)

1977 – The Last Hurrah by Edwin O’Connor (The Last Hurrah)

1976 – Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie (Peter Pan)

1976 – Beauty and the Beast by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont (Beauty and the Beast)

1976 – Meeting at Potsdam by Charles L. Mee Jr. (Truman at Potsdam)

1976 – Works of George Bernard Shaw by George Bernard Shaw (“Caesar and Cleopatra” is included within this book) (Caesar and Cleopatra)

1975 – The Rivalry by Norman Corwin (The Rivalry)

1975 – Valley Forge by Maxwell Anderson (Valley Forge)

1975 – Eric by Doris Herold Lund (Eric)

1975 & 1974 – Paul Gallico’s The Small Miracle by Paul Gallico and Bob Barton (Something Wonderful Happens Every Spring & The Small Miracle)

1975 – If Only They Could Talk & It Shouldn’t Happen to a Vet by James Herriot (All Creatures Great and Small)

1974 – The Gathering Storm by Winston S. Churchill (The Gathering Storm)

1974 – Still Life by Noel Coward (Brief Encounter)

1974 – Crown Matrimonial by Royce Ryton (Crown Matrimonial)

1974 – The Country Girl by Clifford Odets (The Country Girl)

1973 – The Borrowers by Mary Norton (The Borrowers)

1973 – Lisa, Bright and Dark by John Neufeld (Lisa, Bright and Dark)

1973 – Peanuts & You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown by Charles M. Schulz (You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown)

1972 – The Man Who Came to Dinner by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart (The Man Who Came to Dinner)

1972 – The Hands of Cormac Joyce by Leonard Wibberley (The Hands of Cormac Joyce)

1972 – Harvey by Mary Chase (Harvey)

1971 – A Death in the Family by James Agee (All the Way Home)

1971 – The Snow Goose: A Story of Dunkirk by Paul Gallico (The Snow Goose)

1971 – The Collected Works of Paddy Chayefsky: The Stage Plays by Paddy Chayefsky (“Gideon” is included within this book) (Gideon)

1971 – The Price by Arthur Miller (The Price)

1970 and 1953– Hamlet by William Shakespeare (Hamlet)

1970 – The Greatest Story Ever Told by Fulton Oursler, Henry Denker, and Warren Parker (Neither Are We Enemies)

1969 – The Littlest Angel by Charles Tazewell (The Littlest Angel)

1969 – The File on Devlin by Catherine Gaskin (The File on Devlin)

1968 – Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi (Pinocchio)

1968 – The Works Of J. M. Barrie by J. M. Barrie (“The Admirable Crichton” is included within this book) (The Admirable Crichton)

1968 – Elizabeth the Queen by Maxwell Anderson (Elizabeth the Queen)

1967 – Saint Joan by George Bernard Shaw (Saint Joan)

1967 – A Bell for Adano by John Hersey (A Bell for Adano)

1967 – Anastasia by Marcelle Maurette (Anastasia)

1966 – Blithe Spirit by Noel Coward (Blithe Spirit)

1966 – Barefoot in Athens by Maxwell Anderson (Barefoot in Athens)

1966 – Lamp at Midnight by Barrie Stavis (Lamp at Midnight)

1965 – Inherit the Wind by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee (Inherit the Wind)

1965 – The Magnificent Yankee by Emmet Lavery (The Magnificent Yankee)

1964, 1954, 1953, 1952, and 1951 – Amahl and the Night Visitors by Gian Carlo Menotti (Amahl and the Night Visitors)

1964 – Painting as a Pastime by Winston S. Churchill (The Other World of Winston Chuchill)

1964 – The Romancers by Edmond Rostand (The Fantasticks is loosely based on “The Romancers” (The Fantasticks)

1964 and 1958 – Little Moon of Alban by James Constigan (Little Moon of Alban)

1964 – Abe Lincoln in Illinois by Robert E. Sherwood (Abe Lincoln in Illinois)

1963 – Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw (Pygmalion)

1962 – Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand (Cyrano de Bergerac)

1962 – The Teahouse of the August Moon (play by John Patrick, novel by Vern Sneider) (The Teahouse of the August Moon)

1962 – Arsenic and Old Lace by Joseph Kesselring (Arsenic & Old Lace)

1961 – Victoria Regina by Laurence Housman (Victoria Regina)

1961 – Jean Anouilh: Five Plays by Jean Anouilh (“Time Remembered” is included within this book) (Time Remembered)

1960 and 1954 – Macbeth by William Shakespeare (Macbeth)

1960 – Lost Horizon by James Hilton (Shangri-La)

1960 – Captain Brassbound’s Conversion by George Bernard Shaw (Captain Brassbound’s Conversion)

1960 and 1956 – The Cradle Song and Other Plays by Gregorio Martinez Sierra (The Cradle Song)

1960 – The Tempest by William Shakespeare (The Tempest)

1959 – A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen (A Doll’s House)

1959 – Winterset by Maxwell Anderson (Winterset)

1959 – Ah, Wilderness! by Eugene O’Neill (Ah, Wilderness!)

1959 and 1957 – The Green Pastures (play) by Marc Connelly and Ol’ Man Adam an’ His Chillun by Roark Bradford (The Green Pastures)

1959 – Berkeley Square: A Play in Three Acts by John L. Balderston and The Sense of the Past by Henry James (Berkeley Square)

1958 and 1956 – The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare (Kiss Me, Kate and The Taming of the Shrew)

1958 – Johnny Belinda by Elmer Harris (Johnny Belinda)

1958 – Dial M for Murder by Frederick Knott (Dial M for Murder)

1958 – Hans Brinker, or the Silver Skates by Mary Mapes Dodge (Hans Brinker and the Silver Skates)

1957 – Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare (Twelfth Night)

1957 – On Borrowed Time (play) by Paul Osborn & L. E. Watkins and On Borrowed Time (book) by Lawrence Edward Watkin (On Borrowed Time)

1957 –Yeoman of the Guard by W. S. Gilbert (The Yeoman of the Guard)

1957 – There Shall Be No Night by Robert E. Sherwood (There Shall Be No Night)

1957 – The Lark by Lillian Hellman and Jean Anouilh (The Lark)

1956 – The Little Foxes by Lillian Hellman (The Little Foxes)

1956 – Works of George Bernard Shaw by George Bernard Shaw (“Man and Superman” is included within this book) (Man and Superman)

1956 – Born Yesterday: Comedy in 3 Acts by Garson Kanin (Born Yesterday)

1956 – The Corn is Green by Emlyn Williams (The Corn is Green)

1955 – Dream Girl by Elmer Rice (Dream Girl)

1955 – Works of George Bernard Shaw by George Bernard Shaw (“The Devil’s Disciple” is included within this book) (The Devil’s Disciple)

1955 – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Alice in Wonderland)

1954 – Moby-Dick, or, the Whale by Herman Melville (Moby Dick)

1954 – Richard II by William Shakespeare (King Richard II)

1953 – Imaginary Conversations by Walter Savage Landor and Charles George Crump (Aesop and Rhodope)

1953 – Favorite Poems by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (“The Courtship of Miles Standish” is included within this book) (The Courtship of Miles Standish)

1953 – Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man’s Hunger in His Youth by Thomas Wolfe (Of Time and the River)

1953 – The Imaginary Invalid by Jean Baptiste Poquelin Moliere (The Imaginary Invalid)

1953 – The Trampling Herd: The Story of the Cattle Range in America by Paul I. Wellman (McCoy of Abilene)

1953 – The Story of the Other Wise Man by Henry Van Dyke (The Other Wise Man)

1953 – Lincoln’s Little Correspondent by Hertha Ernestine Pauli (Lincoln’s Little Correspondent)

1952 – The Small One: A Story for Those Who Like Christmas and Small Donkeys by Charles Tazewell (The Small One)

1952 – Father Flanagan of Boys Town by Fulton Oursler (The Vision of Father Flanagan)

1952 – Mistress of the White House: The Story of Dolly Madison by Helen L. Morgan (Mistress of the White House)

1952 – Finding Providence: The Story of Roger Williams by Avi (The Story of Roger Williams)

1952 – Doctor Serocold by Helen Ashton (Doctor Serocold)

 

Will you be participating in the Hallmark Hall of Fame Reading Challenge? Which piece of literature from this list would you be interested in reading? Share your thoughts in the comment section!

 

Have fun reading!

Sally Silverscreen