The TBR Tag – 2020

Before I start this tag, I’d like remind everyone that Thursday, March 19th, is the last day to cast your vote for the Best Actor of the 2nd Annual Gold Sally Awards! The Best Actress poll will be re-posted on the 20th! Here is the link to the poll:

 

Now it’s time to choose the Best Actor of the 2020 Gold Sally Awards!

 

Originally, I was going to talk about Black Widow being postponed because of the Coronavirus or the possibility of Apple buying Disney. However, I already published a Word on the Street story discussing several movies’ release dates being affected by the Coronavirus, including some titles from Disney. I also mentioned the Coronavirus on two separate occasions; in the aforementioned Word on the Street story and in the most recent re-cap of When Calls the Heart. So, I won’t be talking about those things in an effort in sound less repetitive. Instead, I’ll be participating in the TBR Tag, in honor of achieving the milestone of publishing 350 posts! Posting this tag is very fitting, since March is National Reading Month. I also got the idea to participate in this tag after reading Katie’s post from Never Not Reading. To my readers, followers, and visitors who are not aware, TBR stands for “To Be Read”. TBRs are comprised of lists and collections of books that one would like to read. While I primarily talk about movies on 18 Cinema Lane, I do like to talk about books from time to time.

If you’d like to read Katie’s post, here’s the link:

https://nevernotreadingblog.wordpress.com/2017/07/23/the-tbr-tag/

City Library Isometric Illustration
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1. How do you keep track of your TBR pile?

For me, I have two ways of organizing which books are on my read-ar (get it? Radar? Reading?). I have a real-life bookshelf in my house where I place several books that I’d like to read. My private board on Pinterest contains a list of books that sound interesting to me. For books that I’m unsure about, I have a list called the “TBR Holding List”, where I’ll write down the name of the book and author until I can determine if I’ll add it to my Pinterest board.

 

2. Is your TBR mostly print or ebook?

I would say that the majority of my TBR collection consists of physical books. However, there are a few ebooks that have caught my eye, such as Chip Crockett’s Christmas Carol.

 

3. How do you determine which book from your TBR to read next?

This question depends on two things. The first is what I feel like reading at that given time. Right now, I’m finishing a book that has over 300 pages, so my next read will contain a shorter page count. The second is whether I’m participating in a readathon. I try to match prompts with books I already own. If one of the books I have conveniently matches one of the prompts, I’ll likely read that book sooner.

 

4. A book that’s been on your TBR the longest.

That would have to be Two Little Girls in Blue by Mary Higgins Clark! I saw the book’s cover in a magazine advertisement years ago. When I read the synopsis, I knew I wanted to eventually read it. Fortunately, I purchased the book at a rummage sale three years ago! Now, all I have to do is set aside some time to read the book.

 

5. A book that you recently added to your TBR.

For my real-life bookshelf, I added Amy Foster and Words on Bathroom Walls, as I received those books as Christmas presents. For my Pinterest board, the last book I added to that list is December Stillness by Mary Downing Hahn.

 

6. A book on your TBR strictly because of its beautiful cover.

Whenever I add a book to my collection, it’s because the story itself sounds interesting. Even though I have books on my shelf and list that have photogenic covers, the way a book looks is not the sole reason why I want to read any story.

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This is a picture of my copy of Amy Foster I received for Christmas. Screenshot taken by me, Sally Silverscreen.
7. A book on your TBR that you NEVER plan on actually reading.

Currently, I can’t think of any books that I’m not interested in reading. If a book is on my shelf or list, it’s because I want to read it. It wouldn’t be there if I didn’t want to check it out.

 

8. An unpublished book on your TBR that you’re excited for.

Unfortunately, I don’t have any answers for this prompt, as every book in my TBR collection has been published at some point.

 

9. A book on your TBR that basically everyone has read except you.

I will say The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern! I’ve seen this book on several Booktube (the book community on Youtube) videos. I do own a physical copy of the story. However, I still haven’t read it.

 

10. A book on your TBR that everyone recommends to you.

There are so many Booktube videos that have brought up The Selection series by Kiera Cass. Some people seem to like it, while others dislike the books. Since I own the first book in the series, I would like to read it, as I want to see where my opinions lie on this particular spectrum.

 

11. A book on your TBR that you’re just dying to read.

As I’ve mentioned before, I’m really looking forward to the film adaptation of Words on Bathroom Walls! However, as of March 2020, the movie is still in post-production. Until it’s finally released, I’ll just read my copy of the book. Fortunately, I plan on reading it very soon!

 

12. The number of books on your Goodreads TBR shelf.

I don’t have a Goodreads account. But, as I’ve mentioned in this tag, I do have a real-life shelf. On it, I own 51 books that are a part of my TBR collection. Meanwhile, my Pinterest board boasts 186 books. In total, my collection contains 237 books!

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What did you think of this tag? What books do you have in your TBR collection? Share your thoughts in the comment section!

 

Have fun at the movies!

Sally Silverscreen

The Book Adaptation Tag — 2019

When I published my review of Meet Me in St. Louis, I posted my 75th movie review! In honor of this accomplishment and because it’s still National Reading Month, I’ve decided to participate in a book related tag! I’ve never done a tag on 18 Cinema Lane before, so this will be an exciting post not only to write, but also to share with my readers and followers! For this tag, I will answer a list of questions relating to book adaptations. I first saw this tag on the blog, Madame Writer. Before I begin, I just want to say that all of my answers are based on honesty and my own opinion. This post is not meant to be mean-spirited or negative toward anyone’s opinions/preferences. So, with that said, let The Book Adaptation Tag begin!

Book Adaptation Tag
Book Adaptation Tag banner created by Madame Writer from the blog, Madame Writer. Image found at https://madamewriterblog.com/2018/07/07/book-adaptation-tag/.
  1. What is the last book adaptation movie you saw?

Meet Me in St. Louis. I didn’t even know this movie was based on a book until I saw the opening credits.

 

  1. What book movie are you most excited for?

There’s actually two. The first movie is Rome in Love. While I haven’t read this book yet, it has been on my TBR (to be read) list for a while. Because this book is being adapted into a film, it’s actually encouraging me to read Anita Hughes’ book! The second movie is Words on Bathroom Walls. I haven’t read this book either, but I’ve heard really good things about it. According to his IMDB filmography, it appears that Charlie Plummer will star as the lead character! I’ve seen All the Money in the World and, in that movie, I was really impressed with Charlie’s performance. Like with Rome in Love, the novel’s aforementioned positive word of mouth and Charlie’s involvement in the film are encouraging me to read the book!

 

  1. Which upcoming book movie will you definitely NOT see?

After. Based on what I’ve heard about the book (I haven’t read it and don’t plan to) and the teaser trailer that was released a few months ago, the movie appears way too inappropriate for my liking. Also, I have a feeling that the main relationship might be promoted as a romantic one, even though it appears to be problematic. Personally, I just think there are better cinematic stories that are worth my time.

 

  1. Which book movie would you NEVER watch again?

The Twilight series and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. For me, the quality of the Twilight films seemed to get worse as the movies went on. I thought the third movie was so bad, I didn’t even bother to watch the last two films. The third movie was also the worst movie I’ve ever seen in the theater. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy was the first movie I saw this year (I had never seen it before) and I did not enjoy it. The only two things I liked about the movie were the acting performances and the special effects (both practical and CGI). I have never read any of the Twilight books (nor do I plan on it) or The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

 

  1. Is there a movie you saw that made you want to read the book, if you hadn’t yet?

Last year, I saw Oliver! and reviewed it when I received 50 followers. I enjoyed this movie so much, that it was not only one of the best movies I saw in 2018, it also made me want to read Oliver Twist! Yes, I know that the book will probably not have as many light-hearted moments as in the movie. But as long as the story is as engaging as it was in the film, I think I might like the book.

 

  1. Conversely, is there a movie that made you never want to read the book?

Lifetime’s adaptations of the Flowers in the Attic series and My Sweet Audrina. As I said in a Word on the Street post last month, these movies are not “Hallmark appropriate”. So, there’s a good likelihood that the books are also inappropriate.

The Beach House novel
My copy of The Beach House novel. Photo taken by me, Sally Silverscreen.
  1. Name an adaptation that has almost nothing to do with the book it’s supposedly based on.

I can think of two; Something Wicked This Way Comes and The Count of Monte Cristo (2002). Both of these movies made the exact same mistake: they only adapted 50% of the book. While the first half of The Count of Monte Cristo did a really good job at translating the literary material to the screen, the second half of the movie was just a mess. Several important details and story elements were either left out or completely changed. In Something Wicked This Way Comes, some of the plot points and details were exactly like the book. However, there were others that were changed just for the sake of being changed. One example is a character in the film that wasn’t in the book. Anyone who has read the book and seen the movie would know exactly what I’m talking about.

 

  1. Have you ever left the theater during a movie adaptation because it was so bad?

No. I don’t go to the theater often, so I try to see films that I either have a strong feeling I will like or that are from a movie series I’ve seen before.

 

  1. Do you prefer to watch the movie first or read the book first?

Personally, I try to read the book first so that I can form my own ideas about the text before the movie creates its own ideas about it. But I’m not opposed to reading a book after I’ve seen its respective film.

 

  1. How do you feel about movie adaptations that age characters up? (ex. characters that are in middle-school, but in the movies they’re all 18)

I think it’s a case-by-case scenario. For an opposite example, in The Beach House, some of the characters were younger than they were in the book. At first, I was not a fan of this decision. But, when I watched the movie, I ended up ignoring this detail because I was more focused on how good the acting performances were.

 

  1. Do you get angry when the actors don’t look like how you thought the characters should have looked?

Again, it’s a case-by-case scenario. I remember when Shailene Woodley was cast as Hazel in The Fault in Our Stars. Her portrayal of the character did not look anything like I had imagined the character to look in the book. However, this difference did not bother me because Hazel’s physical appearance was not emphasized within the book.

 

  1. Is there a movie you liked better than its book?

Hallmark Hall of Fame’s The Beach House. I’m currently reading this book (I’m more than half-way through the novel) and I think it’s just ok. The biggest issue I have with this novel is how unnecessarily long it is. In my opinion, I don’t think this particular story needed to be 400+ pages. Because of the story’s page length, it makes the chapters and even the book itself feel longer than it might have been intended. Also, there were things that were included in the book just to satisfy this 400+ page length. In the movie, however, it felt like the screen-writing improved upon the narrative from the text. Only the important story-lines were translated to the screen and the length of the movie was just right. Also, the narrative felt more like a Hallmark Hall of Fame story in the film than it did in the book.

 

  1. Name a book that you would love to see as a movie.

Definitely Hurt Go Happy by Ginny Rorby! I think that book would make a great Hallmark Hall of Fame movie!

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If you have never read Hurt Go Happy, I would highly suggest that you, at least, give it a chance. Screenshot taken by me, Sally Silverscreen.
Have you ever participated in a tag? What are your thoughts on book adaptations? Let me know in the comment section!

 

Have fun at the movies!

Sally Silverscreen

Introducing the Hallmark Hall of Fame Reading Challenge

Happy National Reading Month! When this time of year comes around, I usually don’t do anything to celebrate the occasion. As a reader, I have felt bad about not doing anything to acknowledge it. But, now that I have a blog, I have the opportunity to commemorate National Reading Month! Over the years, I’ve observed how many Hallmark Hall of Fame movies are based on pre-existing literature. This inspired me to create the Hallmark Hall of Fame Reading Challenge! As I was researching the history of Hallmark Hall of Fame, I discovered that there are a lot of plays, short stories, and novels that were adapted into films. Honestly, there were so much pre-existing literature associated with Hallmark Hall of Fame, it took me several days to complete this list. Even though this reading list is very long, you do not have to complete this reading challenge within the month of March. In fact, you can complete this challenge whenever you want! Also, you can read as many or as few books as you like! If you want to watch the Hallmark Hall of Fame movies that these literary works were adapted into, that is completely optional. Now, I’ll explain the set-up of this reading challenge list!

Starting on the left, each book is listed in the chronological order of the film’s release. For instance, even though Richard Paul Evans’ book, The Locket, was published in 1998, the movie adaptation was released in 2002. The title of the book and the book’s author are listed next. After that, the title of the film is placed within parentheses. There are times when a film adaptation does not share the same title as its respective piece of literature. A recent example of this is The Second Sister being the basis for Christmas Everlasting. Feel free to scroll through the list and find your next piece of literature for the Hallmark Hall of Fame Reading Challenge!

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Hallmark Hall of Fame Reading Challenge

2018 – The Second Sister by Marie Bostwick (Christmas Everlasting)

2018 – The Beach House by Mary Alice Monroe (The Beach House)

2017 – The Christmas Train by David Baldacci (The Christmas Train)

2017 – Love Locks by Cory Martin (Love Locks)

2016 – A Heavenly Christmas by Rhonda Merwarth (A Heavenly Christmas)

2012 – Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor by Lisa Kleypas (Christmas with Holly)

2012 – A Smile as Big as the Moon by Mike Kersjes with Joe Layden (A Smile as Big as the Moon)

2011 – Have a Little Faith by Mitch Albom (Have a Little Faith)

2011 – Nobody Don’t Love Nobody: Lessons on Love from the School with No Name by Stacey Bess (Beyond the Blackboard)

2011 – The Last Valentine by James Michael Pratt (The Lost Valentine)

2010 – The November Christmas by Greg Coppa (November Christmas)

2010 – The Lois Wilson Story: When Love Is Not Enough by William G. Borchert (When Love Is Not Enough: The Lois Wilson Story)

2009 – A Dog Named Christmas by Greg Kincaid (A Dog Named Christmas)

2009 – Irena Sendler: Mother of the Children of the Holocaust by Anna Mieszkowska (The Courageous Heart of Irena Sendler)

2008 – Front of the Class: How Tourette Syndrome Made Me the Teacher I Never Had by Brad Cohen with Lisa Wysocky (Front of the Class)

2008 – Sweet Nothing In My Ear: A Play In Two Acts by Stephen Sachs (Sweet Nothing In My Ear)

2007 – Pictures of Hollis Woods by Patricia Reilly Giff (Pictures of Hollis Woods)

2007 – The Valley of Light by Terry Kay (The Valley of Light)

2006 – Candles on Bay Street by K.C. McKinnon (Candles on Bay Street)

2006 — If Nights Could Talk: A Family Memoir by Marsha Recknagel (In from the Night)

2006 – The Water is Wide by Pat Conroy (The Water Is Wide)

2005 – Silver Bells by Luanne Rice (Silver Bells)

2005 – Riding the Bus with My Sister by Rachel Simon (Riding the Bus with My Sister)

2005 – The Magic of Ordinary Days by Ann Howard Creel (The Magic of Ordinary Days)

2004 – Back When We Were Grownups by Anne Tyler (Back When We Were Grownups)

2004 – Plainsong by Kent Haruf (Plainsong)

2004 – The Blackwater Lightship by Colm Toibin (The Blackwater Lightship)

2003 – Fallen Angel by Don J. Snyder (Fallen Angel)

2003 – A Painted House by John Grisham (A Painted House)

2003 – Girl in Hyacinth Blue by Susan Vreeland (Brush with Fate)

2002 – The Locket by Richard Paul Evans (The Locket)

2002 – My Sister’s Keeper: Learning to Cope with a Sibling’s Mental Illness by Margaret Moorman (My Sister’s Keeper)

2001 – Love and War in the Apennines by Eric Newby (In Love and War)

2001 – Follow the Stars Home by Luanne Rice (Follow the Stars Home)

2001 – The Flamingo Rising by Larry Baker (The Flamingo Rising)

2000 – The Runaway by Terry Kay (The Runaway)

2000 – Looking for Lost Bird: A Jewish Woman Discovers Her Navajo Roots by Yvette Melanson with Claire Safran (The Lost Child)

2000 – Cupid and Diana by Christina Bartolomeo (Cupid & Cate)

2000 – Atticus by Ron Hansen (Missing Pieces)

1999 – A Season for Miracles by Marilyn Pappano (A Season for Miracles)

1999 – Caleb’s Story by Patricia MacLachlan (Sarah, Plain and Tall: Winter’s End)

1999 – Durango by John B. Keane (Durango)

1999 – Night Ride Home by Barbara Esstman (Night Ride Home)

1998 – Grace & Glorie: A Play in Two Acts by Tom Ziegler (Grace & Glorie)

1998 – Saint Maybe by Anne Tyler (Saint Maybe)

1998 – Thunderwith by Libby Hathorn (The Echo of Thunder)

1998 – The Love Letter by Jack Finney (The Love Letter)

1997 – Ellen Foster by Kaye Gibbons (Ellen Foster)

1997 – What the Deaf-Mute Heard by G.D. Gearino (What the Deaf Man Heard)

1997 – For the Roses by Julie Garwood (Rose Hill)

1997 – The Wild Palms by William Faulkner (Old Man)

1996 – Calm at Sunset, Calm at Dawn by Paul Watkins (Calm at Sunset)

1996 – Lily Dale by Horton Foote (Lily Dale)

1996 – The Boys Next Door by Tom Griffin (The Boys Next Door)

1995 – Journey by Patricia MacLachlan (Journey)

1995 – Redwood Curtain by Lanford Wilson (Redwood Curtain)

1995 – The Piano Lesson by August Wilson (The Piano Lesson)

1994 – The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy (The Return of the Native)

1994 – Breathing Lessons by Anne Tyler (Breathing Lessons)

1993 – To Dance with the White Dog by Terry Kay (To Dance with the White Dog)

1993 – Skylark by Patricia MacLachlan (Skylark)

1992 – A Shayna Maidel by Barbara Lebow (Miss Rose White)

1992 – O Pioneers! by Willa Cather (O Pioneers!)

1991 – Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan (Sarah, Plain and Tall)

1990 — Decoration Day by John William Corrington (Decoration Day)

1990 – Father’s Arcane Daughter by E. L. Konigsburg (Caroline?)

1989 – The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher (The Shell Seekers)

1988 – The Tenth Man by Graham Greene (The Tenth Man)

1988 – April Morning by Howard Fast (April Morning)

1988 – Stones for Ibarra by Harriet Doerr (Stones for Ibarra)

1987 – Foxfire by Susan Cooper (Foxfire)

1987 – The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett (The Secret Garden)

1987 – Pack of Lies by Hugh Whitemore (Pack of Lies)

1987 – The Room Upstairs by Norma Levinson (The Room Upstairs)

1985 – Love Is Never Silent by Joanne Greenberg (Love Is Never Silent)

1985 – The Corsican Brothers by Alexandre Dumas (father) (The Corsican Brothers)

1984 – La Dame aux Camélias by Alexandre Dumas (son) (Camille)

1984 – The Master of Ballantrae by Robert Louis Stevenson (The Master of Ballantrae)

1983 – The Winter of our Discontent by John Steinbeck (The Winter of our Discontent)

1983 – Thursday’s Child by Victoria Poole (Thursday’s Child)

1982 – Witness for the Prosecution by Agatha Christie (Witness for the Prosecution)

1982 – The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame)

1981 – Dear Liar: A Biography in Two Acts: Adapted from the Correspondence of Bernard Shaw and Mrs. Patrick Campbell by Jerome Kilty (Dear Liar)

1980 – A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

1980 – Gideon’s Trumpet by Anthony Lewis (Gideon’s Trumpet)

1979 – All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (All Quiet on the Western Front)

1978 – Stubby Pringle’s Christmas by Jack Schaefer (Stubby Pringle’s Christmas)

1978 – Homely Girl, A Life: And Other Stories by Arthur Miller (“Fame” is included within this book) (Fame)

1977 – The Court-Martial of George Armstrong Custer: A Novel by Douglas C. Jones (The Court Martial of George Armstrong Custer)

1977 – The Last Hurrah by Edwin O’Connor (The Last Hurrah)

1976 – Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie (Peter Pan)

1976 – Beauty and the Beast by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont (Beauty and the Beast)

1976 – Meeting at Potsdam by Charles L. Mee Jr. (Truman at Potsdam)

1976 – Works of George Bernard Shaw by George Bernard Shaw (“Caesar and Cleopatra” is included within this book) (Caesar and Cleopatra)

1975 – The Rivalry by Norman Corwin (The Rivalry)

1975 – Valley Forge by Maxwell Anderson (Valley Forge)

1975 – Eric by Doris Herold Lund (Eric)

1975 & 1974 – Paul Gallico’s The Small Miracle by Paul Gallico and Bob Barton (Something Wonderful Happens Every Spring & The Small Miracle)

1975 – If Only They Could Talk & It Shouldn’t Happen to a Vet by James Herriot (All Creatures Great and Small)

1974 – The Gathering Storm by Winston S. Churchill (The Gathering Storm)

1974 – Still Life by Noel Coward (Brief Encounter)

1974 – Crown Matrimonial by Royce Ryton (Crown Matrimonial)

1974 – The Country Girl by Clifford Odets (The Country Girl)

1973 – The Borrowers by Mary Norton (The Borrowers)

1973 – Lisa, Bright and Dark by John Neufeld (Lisa, Bright and Dark)

1973 – Peanuts & You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown by Charles M. Schulz (You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown)

1972 – The Man Who Came to Dinner by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart (The Man Who Came to Dinner)

1972 – The Hands of Cormac Joyce by Leonard Wibberley (The Hands of Cormac Joyce)

1972 – Harvey by Mary Chase (Harvey)

1971 – A Death in the Family by James Agee (All the Way Home)

1971 – The Snow Goose: A Story of Dunkirk by Paul Gallico (The Snow Goose)

1971 – The Collected Works of Paddy Chayefsky: The Stage Plays by Paddy Chayefsky (“Gideon” is included within this book) (Gideon)

1971 – The Price by Arthur Miller (The Price)

1970 and 1953– Hamlet by William Shakespeare (Hamlet)

1970 – The Greatest Story Ever Told by Fulton Oursler, Henry Denker, and Warren Parker (Neither Are We Enemies)

1969 – The Littlest Angel by Charles Tazewell (The Littlest Angel)

1969 – The File on Devlin by Catherine Gaskin (The File on Devlin)

1968 – Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi (Pinocchio)

1968 – The Works Of J. M. Barrie by J. M. Barrie (“The Admirable Crichton” is included within this book) (The Admirable Crichton)

1968 – Elizabeth the Queen by Maxwell Anderson (Elizabeth the Queen)

1967 – Saint Joan by George Bernard Shaw (Saint Joan)

1967 – A Bell for Adano by John Hersey (A Bell for Adano)

1967 – Anastasia by Marcelle Maurette (Anastasia)

1966 – Blithe Spirit by Noel Coward (Blithe Spirit)

1966 – Barefoot in Athens by Maxwell Anderson (Barefoot in Athens)

1966 – Lamp at Midnight by Barrie Stavis (Lamp at Midnight)

1965 – Inherit the Wind by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee (Inherit the Wind)

1965 – The Magnificent Yankee by Emmet Lavery (The Magnificent Yankee)

1964, 1954, 1953, 1952, and 1951 – Amahl and the Night Visitors by Gian Carlo Menotti (Amahl and the Night Visitors)

1964 – Painting as a Pastime by Winston S. Churchill (The Other World of Winston Chuchill)

1964 – The Romancers by Edmond Rostand (The Fantasticks is loosely based on “The Romancers” (The Fantasticks)

1964 and 1958 – Little Moon of Alban by James Constigan (Little Moon of Alban)

1964 – Abe Lincoln in Illinois by Robert E. Sherwood (Abe Lincoln in Illinois)

1963 – Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw (Pygmalion)

1962 – Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand (Cyrano de Bergerac)

1962 – The Teahouse of the August Moon (play by John Patrick, novel by Vern Sneider) (The Teahouse of the August Moon)

1962 – Arsenic and Old Lace by Joseph Kesselring (Arsenic & Old Lace)

1961 – Victoria Regina by Laurence Housman (Victoria Regina)

1961 – Jean Anouilh: Five Plays by Jean Anouilh (“Time Remembered” is included within this book) (Time Remembered)

1960 and 1954 – Macbeth by William Shakespeare (Macbeth)

1960 – Lost Horizon by James Hilton (Shangri-La)

1960 – Captain Brassbound’s Conversion by George Bernard Shaw (Captain Brassbound’s Conversion)

1960 and 1956 – The Cradle Song and Other Plays by Gregorio Martinez Sierra (The Cradle Song)

1960 – The Tempest by William Shakespeare (The Tempest)

1959 – A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen (A Doll’s House)

1959 – Winterset by Maxwell Anderson (Winterset)

1959 – Ah, Wilderness! by Eugene O’Neill (Ah, Wilderness!)

1959 and 1957 – The Green Pastures (play) by Marc Connelly and Ol’ Man Adam an’ His Chillun by Roark Bradford (The Green Pastures)

1959 – Berkeley Square: A Play in Three Acts by John L. Balderston and The Sense of the Past by Henry James (Berkeley Square)

1958 and 1956 – The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare (Kiss Me, Kate and The Taming of the Shrew)

1958 – Johnny Belinda by Elmer Harris (Johnny Belinda)

1958 – Dial M for Murder by Frederick Knott (Dial M for Murder)

1958 – Hans Brinker, or the Silver Skates by Mary Mapes Dodge (Hans Brinker and the Silver Skates)

1957 – Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare (Twelfth Night)

1957 – On Borrowed Time (play) by Paul Osborn & L. E. Watkins and On Borrowed Time (book) by Lawrence Edward Watkin (On Borrowed Time)

1957 –Yeoman of the Guard by W. S. Gilbert (The Yeoman of the Guard)

1957 – There Shall Be No Night by Robert E. Sherwood (There Shall Be No Night)

1957 – The Lark by Lillian Hellman and Jean Anouilh (The Lark)

1956 – The Little Foxes by Lillian Hellman (The Little Foxes)

1956 – Works of George Bernard Shaw by George Bernard Shaw (“Man and Superman” is included within this book) (Man and Superman)

1956 – Born Yesterday: Comedy in 3 Acts by Garson Kanin (Born Yesterday)

1956 – The Corn is Green by Emlyn Williams (The Corn is Green)

1955 – Dream Girl by Elmer Rice (Dream Girl)

1955 – Works of George Bernard Shaw by George Bernard Shaw (“The Devil’s Disciple” is included within this book) (The Devil’s Disciple)

1955 – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Alice in Wonderland)

1954 – Moby-Dick, or, the Whale by Herman Melville (Moby Dick)

1954 – Richard II by William Shakespeare (King Richard II)

1953 – Imaginary Conversations by Walter Savage Landor and Charles George Crump (Aesop and Rhodope)

1953 – Favorite Poems by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (“The Courtship of Miles Standish” is included within this book) (The Courtship of Miles Standish)

1953 – Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man’s Hunger in His Youth by Thomas Wolfe (Of Time and the River)

1953 – The Imaginary Invalid by Jean Baptiste Poquelin Moliere (The Imaginary Invalid)

1953 – The Trampling Herd: The Story of the Cattle Range in America by Paul I. Wellman (McCoy of Abilene)

1953 – The Story of the Other Wise Man by Henry Van Dyke (The Other Wise Man)

1953 – Lincoln’s Little Correspondent by Hertha Ernestine Pauli (Lincoln’s Little Correspondent)

1952 – The Small One: A Story for Those Who Like Christmas and Small Donkeys by Charles Tazewell (The Small One)

1952 – Father Flanagan of Boys Town by Fulton Oursler (The Vision of Father Flanagan)

1952 – Mistress of the White House: The Story of Dolly Madison by Helen L. Morgan (Mistress of the White House)

1952 – Finding Providence: The Story of Roger Williams by Avi (The Story of Roger Williams)

1952 – Doctor Serocold by Helen Ashton (Doctor Serocold)

 

Will you be participating in the Hallmark Hall of Fame Reading Challenge? Which piece of literature from this list would you be interested in reading? Share your thoughts in the comment section!

 

Have fun reading!

Sally Silverscreen